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Tourist Attractions in Australia Part 1

Australia is a land of dreams. From the sacred legends of the aboriginal Dreamtime, when the great spirits conjured the coral reefs, rainforests, and scorched red deserts, to armchair travelers who describe Australia as their dream destination, the Land Down Under deserves all the hype. The world’s smallest continent and largest island, Australia is almost the same size as the United States but with a population the size of New York State and some of the quirkiest wildlife on the planet.


Kangaroo Island


Nature takes center stage at beautiful Kangaroo Island off the Fleurieu Peninsula in South Australia. Kangaroos hop along the powdery shores, sea lions and penguins frolic in the crystal-clear waters, and koalas cling to the fragrant eucalyptus trees. Diving is also excellent. You can spot sea dragons in the temperate waters, and many wrecks lie offshore. The striking, wind-sculpted rock formations, known as the Remarkable Rocks and Admirals Arch in Flinders Chase National Park are other distinctive features of the island, and you’ll find plenty of hiking trails along the soaring sea cliffs and in the pristine forests. Foodies, too, will be in heaven. Creamy cheeses, Ligurian honey, and fresh seafood grace the plates in local restaurants. To get here, you can fly direct to the island from Adelaide or catch a ferry from Cape Jervis on the Fleurieu Peninsula.



Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park



Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park is a national tourism treasure and a nirvana for nature lovers. Sparkling lakes, serrated dolerite peaks, alpine heathland, and dense forests characterize the raw, glacier-carved wilderness here, and 1,616-meter Mount Ossa is one of the park’s most distinctive features and the highest point in Tasmania. As you might expect, hiking here is fantastic. Favorites include the Weindorfer Walk, a six-kilometer loop through dense forests, and Lake Dove Walk, with breathtaking vistas of Cradle Mountain (1,545 meters). Stand on the summit of Cradle Mountain, and you can soak up stunning views of the central highlands. Experienced hikers can also tackle the famous 80-kilometer Overland Track, which runs south from Cradle Valley to stunning Lake St. Clair, Australia’s deepest lake. Keep an eye out for Tasmanian devils, wombats, wallabies, pademelons, and platypus among the many species of weird and wonderful wildlife.


Uluru/Ayers Rock


One of the world’s largest monoliths, Ayers Rock is also one of the top tourist attractions in Australia. Located within the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park of the Northern Territory, this large sandstone formation stands more than 340 meters (1,100 feet) high. One of the rock’s peculiarities is that it changes colors dramatically at sunset from terra cotta to blue, violet and red. The local Aboriginal tribe, known as Anangu, call the rock Uluru and regard it as a sacred siteOne of the world’s largest monoliths, Ayers Rock is also one of the top tourist attractions in Australia. Located within the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park of the Northern Territory, this large sandstone formation stands more than 340 meters (1,100 feet) high. One of the rock’s peculiarities is that it changes colors dramatically at sunset from terra cotta to blue, violet and red. The local Aboriginal tribe, known as Anangu, call the rock Uluru and regard it as a sacred site.


Whitsunday Islands


This stunning collection of 74 islands lies in the middle of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, making them a perfect jumping off spot for travelers looking to explore the amazing and colorful marine life that live in the waters of this area. Although most of the Whitsunday Islands are deserted, seven do have outstanding resorts on them, including the world-famous One&Only on Hayman Island, a favorite of celebrities and the rich and famous. One of the most beautiful of the Whitsunday Islands is Whitehaven Beach, which boasts blinding white sands. These islands are the perfect choice for travelers seeking a blissful vacation on a lovely tropical island or for those who enjoy hours of snorkeling and scuba diving.

Broome and the Kimberley region


Once the pearl capital of the world, Broome, in Western Australia, is now a booming tourist town and the gateway to the spectacular Kimberley region. Its star tourist attraction, Cable Beach, with seemingly endless white sands and turquoise water is one of Australia’s best beaches, and riding camels at sunset is one of the most popular things to do here. Other highlights include the Broome Historical Museum; Broome Crocodile Park; and the Staircase to the Moon, a phenomenon during certain conditions between March and October, where the moonlight creates an optical illusion of steps leading to the moon. From Broome, you can explore the rugged and remote Kimberley region and its incredible natural attractions like the Horizontal Waterfall, Cape Leveque, the Gibb River Road, Purnululu (Bungle Bungle) National Park, and the stunning cascades of Mitchell Falls.

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